Strawberry Jam Biscuits

Strawberry Jam Biscuits

It’s jam time…that’s right, one of my very favorite times of the year.  The time of year when those empty shelves in my pantry start getting filled with all sorts of delicious cooked fruit.  My daughters love that I make jam, in fact my younger daughter refuses to eat any other jam except my homemade.  You could say I have spoiled them, or maybe just taught them what good food is.

I have already started stock piling for the holidays – but I always save some for the girls.  Usually I just put the leftovers in a ramekin, or in a jar that is not labeled, that I place on a special shelf in the pantry – “our jam section” – as opposed to the jam for gifts.  Last week I came over after a long day, and saw that there was a new jar of strawberry vanilla jam in the refrigerator.  I just about lost it.  Ok, so it wasn’t my proudest moment – but when I asked why they didn’t use the other two already opened jars of jam (one which I might add was the exact same variety, and another was the leftover jam I used for these delicious treats) – they told me that the jam with the pretty labels tastes even better.  Seriously???  I was so angry, but part of me was laughing inside (although that laughing started much later) – but I was fuming that they had just wasted one of my holiday jams.  I brought them into the pantry and showed them where I keep “our jam section” as opposed to the “holiday jam section”.  Of course the “holiday jam section” has about 30 jars already – where as ours only has about 5.  The girls didn’t understand why they didn’t get both.  Wow – that would be a lot of jam.  So – no Mom of the year award for me…

Back to this recipe…I found this in Bon Appetit, and I felt like it was time to actually bake with some jam.  These were so perfect for strawberry season – just the right amount of sweetness with the biscuit – the girls ate them every morning before swim team, and they were gone in no time.  Fortunately there is still some of that great leftover jam in the refrigerator…I just need to get a label for the jar, and it will disappear magically, so I am told.

Ingredients

Strawberry Jam

  • 12  ounces fresh strawberries, hulled, halved or quartered if large (about 3  cups)
  • 1/4  cup sugar
  • 1  tablespoon finely grated lime zest
  • 2 tablespoons fresh  lime juice

Biscuits

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2  teaspoons  baking  powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher  salt
  • 2 1/4 cups  all-purpose  flour plus more
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon finely  grated lime zest
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg, beaten to blend
  • 1 tablespoon raw  sugar
  • Vanilla ice cream (for  serving)

Preparation

Strawberry Jam

Cook strawberries and sugar in a medium saucepan over  medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until jamlike in consistency, 12–15  minutes. Remove from heat; stir in lime zest and juice. Pour into a shallow bowl  and let cool.

Biscuits

Preheat oven to 400°. Whisk sugar, baking powder, salt, and 2  1/4 cups flour in a large bowl. Add butter and lime zest and blend with your  fingertips until coarse crumbs form. Add buttermilk and, using a fork, mix until  just combined. Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Gently knead just until a  shaggy, moist dough forms, about 4 times.

Roll out dough about 1/2-inch thick. Using a 2 1/2-inch  biscuit cutter or inverted glass, cut out rounds. Gather scraps and repeat  rolling and cutting until all dough is used.  Place biscuits on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Using your  thumb, make a large divot in the center of each biscuit; brush with egg and  sprinkle liberally with raw sugar. Spoon a scant 1 teaspoon strawberry jam into  each divot.

Bake biscuits until golden brown, 18–22 minutes. Serve warm  with vanilla ice cream, if using, and remaining jam.

DO AHEAD: Jam can be made 3 days ahead.  Cover and chill.

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Strawberry Jam Biscuits 2

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Raspberry Jam

Raspberry Jam 2

When my kids were in day care – I had no idea how lucky I was that I didn’t have to provide food.  The day care they went to served breakfast, lunch and a morning and afternoon snack – all cooked on the premises by “the cooker” as my girls called her.  It was my older daughter that coined the phrase, and it stuck – and to this day, it still makes me smile.  When my girls started school – I was actually excited to start making them lunches.  That lasted a few weeks.  Years later, it is one of the chores I dread the most.  I have run out of ideas, and feel like I am giving them the same things day after day.  They are always asking me to pack their thermos, but the problem is that I have to be home in the morning (with some extra time) to do that – and normally I leave so early in the morning that I pack their lunches the night before.

My older daughter is a cold-cut person – she just wants her meat and cheese – hold the bread.  My younger daughter on the other hand, is all about the bread – and wants peanut butter and jelly every day.  That was never something I liked as a kid, and my older daughter is the same way.  I would ask for a PB&J, hold the J.  What I realized recently is the bread is important, but the jelly is critical.  She has become quite the jam/jelly aficionado – I think I have mentioned this before on the blog, but she refuses now to eat any jam/jelly that is not homemade by me.  I have ruined her for life.  Her favorite?  She has lots of favorites, including this raspberry jam from Food in Jars.  As you can see by the jar, there was hardly any left to take a picture of!  I wasn’t able to make a big batch the first time – but let me tell you – as soon as the raspberries show up at the fruit stand down the street – I will be making jars of this stuff.  Enough to last for months – because she loves it that much.

If anyone has any interesting ideas of lunches for my kids, I would love to hear them.  I have 10 lunches to make, just this week – OH WAIT!!  No school on Friday – hooray for that, and only 8 lunches to go until the weekend!!

Blog update…I thought I lost the original pictures that I took of the jam, but somehow they appeared!  Now you can see the full jar below.

Ingredients

  • 6 cups crushed raspberries (about 2 dry quarts)
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 packet (3-ounces) liquid pectin

Preparation

Fill your canning pot with water and begin to bring it to temperature. Wash your jars and rings in warm soapy water and set aside. Put your lids in a small pot of water and heat (but do not boil) in order to soften the sealing compound.

Combine the crushed berries and sugar in a large pot and stir to combine. Bring to a boil over high heat and stir frequently until all berries have broken down and the bubbles look thick and viscous, about 15-20 minutes.  Add the pectin and lemon juice and bring to a rolling boil for a full five minutes.

Turn off the heat under the jam and fill jars. Wipe rims and apply lids. Screw on the bands and lower into the water. Process in the hot water bath 10 minutes. When time is up, remove from water and cool on the counter. When the jars are cooled, check the seal by pressing on the top of the jar. If there’s no movement, the jar has sealed. Store up to one year in a cool, dark place.

Makes 4 pints.

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Raspberry Jam

Raspberry Jam

Rhubarb Jelly

Rhubarb Jelly 2

I am just too busy right now…I have so many things I want to do, and the weekends just seem to fly by and my lists just get longer.  Jam season is among us, and I feel like I could spend days in the kitchen (before it gets warm), cooking down fruit into a glorious state – just ready to pour into jars.  I had all intentions of making some this weekend – but too many other things got in the way.  I just hope I am not missing my opportunity for some of the ripe fruit – particularly rhubarb…

Last year when I took the jam class that really gave me the itch, one of the recipes we made was a wonderful rosemary rhubarb jelly.  It was a glorious pink color – like a pink rose – and the taste was incredible.  Even my younger daughter couldn’t get enough of that jelly with her peanut butter.  At that point the rhubarb was just about done in the markets – and I was so disappointed – but I had so many other jams and jellies on my list, I didn’t think too much about it.  I figured it would be at the top of my list for this year.

Late in the summer a friend of mine called me – she really wanted me to teach her how to make jam – with the fruit from her garden.  She had frozen a ton of rhubarb and raspberries – two of the fruits that I didn’t have time to turn into jam.  I was so excited.  I found a recipe in Food in Jars for rhubarb jelly – and boy was it amazing.  I actually made this jelly last summer, and it has been sitting in my pantry all this time.  We have been slowly going through my stash of jam/jelly, and finally it was time to open this one.  The color was not nearly as pink as the first time I made it in class – but I think it was the variety of rhubarb that we were using.  The stalks were not deep red  – but it didn’t matter at all.  The jelly tasted incredible.  My younger daughter told me again last week, “Don’t ever buy jam or jelly in the store again – I will only eat yours.”  Ok – so is that a compliment or what??  I may not be super-mom (a story for another time) – but boy can I make jam and jelly.  Maybe they will let it go to the top of the list next weekend…

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds rhubarb, chopped
  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 (1.75 ounce/50 g packet) powdered pectin

Preparation

Fill your canning pot with water and begin to bring it to temperature. Wash your jars and rings in warm soapy water and set aside. Put your lids in a small pot of water and heat (but do not boil) in order to soften the sealing compound.

Combine the chopped rhubarb and 3 cups water in a pot.  Cover and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the rhubarb has completely broken down and the water is tinted a vivid pink.

Line a large, fine-mesh sieve with cheesecloth and place it over a large bowl.  Pour the cooked rhubarb through.  Let it sit and drip for at least 30 minutes.  Do not press the rhubarb pulp, as that will make your jelly cloudy.  Discard the solids in the sieve and measure out 4 cups of rhubarb juice.

Measure the sugar into a bowl. Whisk the powdered pectin into the sugar to blend.  In a large, nonreactive pot, combine the rhubarb juice and the pectin-spiked sugar.  Bring to a boil and cook over high heat for 15-25 minutes, stirring frequently, until the volume in the pot is greatly reduced.  While you continue to stir, clip a candy thermometer to the pot and watch until the pot reaches 220 degrees F.  There will be a great deal of foaming and bubbling before it reaches this point.  It should look thick and syrupy and the bubbles should look glossy.

Test the set of the jelly using the saucer test (place a saucer in the freezer when you start – when you think the jam is done, place a drop on the plate and return to the freezer for 1-2 minutes, it should wrinkle when you push on it).  If it doesn’t pass, return the pot to the heat and cook for an additional 5 minutes before repeating the test.  When the jelly has reached the desired consistency, turn off the heat and fill the jars. Wipe rims and apply lids. Screw on the bands and lower into the water. Process in the hot water bath 10 minutes. When time is up, remove from water and cool on the counter. When the jars are cooled, check the seal by pressing on the top of the jar. If there’s no movement, the jar has sealed. Store up to one year in a cool, dark place.

Makes 4 half-pint jars.

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Rhubarb Jelly

Carrot Cardamom Jam

Carrot Cardamon Jam

I have been in a little funk lately – and I think I finally figured out what it is.  I miss making jam – it has been at least a month since I have made a batch, and it is leaving a little bit of a void in my life.  I thought after making about 80 jars between June and December that I would need a couple of months just to get back into it – but I am ready.  I am ready to get back on that horse.  Now, there is just a couple of small problems…fresh fruit, and time.

Of all the jams I made this summer and fall, I hardly ventured into what I would call the “risky” jams.  Those are the jams that you don’t really use to make a peanut butter and jam sandwich.  I think my Fig Jam was the only one that came close – and after I saw her lick the spoon clean from the sample I gave her, I was pretty sure it would go perfect with peanut butter.  I remember when I had an open jar of the Mulled Cider Jelly in the refrigerator, and decided to use that on her sandwich.  I was sure I would hear about it that night – since that was my first attempt to broaden her from the berry or stone fruit jams.  That night as I started to make her a sandwich for the next day, she called from upstairs asking if I could use that really yummy jam again…success!

Last month when I attended the holiday gift workshop at The Pantry, I was overjoyed when I saw we were going to be making jam.  Not that I needed any more to give out – but I was so excited to try this jam, that would definitely go into the “risky” category.  Not only was this jam beautiful (look at the color!), it was delicious – especially with goat cheese.  This is the perfect appetizer jam.  So – aren’t you curious to see how this would go with peanut butter?  Well, you might have to make it to find out – and the good news is that you can get fresh carrots in the market pretty much all year.  I am holding out putting on my daughter’s sandwich – but if I run out of her other favorites…that might be next.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound 2 ounces fresh young carrots, peeled and cut into ½-inch chunks
  • Finely grated zest of 2 lemons
  • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Finely grated zest of 1 orange
  • Freshly squeezed juice of 1 orange, about ½ cup
  • 1 ½ teaspoons roughly ground cardamom seed
  • 2 ¼ pounds sugar
  • 4 ½ ounces liquid pectin

 Preparation

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.  Add the carrots, reduce the heat slightly and simmer for about 8-10 minutes, until the carrots are tender but not mushy or falling apart.  Drain the carrots, run them under cold water to stop them from overcooking and set them aside in a colander to drain for a few minutes.

Place the carrots in a food processor and pulse until the carrots are finely chopped.  Be sure not to take them down to a puree.

Place the carrots, lemon zest and juice, orange zest and juice, and cardamom in a heavy bottomed stock pot.  Add the sugar and cook over high heat until the mixture comes to a boil.  Boil hard for 5 minutes, skimming and discarding any foam that rises to the surface.

Add the pectin and return to the boil.  Cook for another 1-3 minutes, testing for a set often.  When the jam has reached the desired consistency, remove the pot from the heat and ladle the jam into clean, sterilized jars.  Process as desired or cool and then store in the refrigerator.

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Carrot Cardamom Jam

Mulled Cider Jelly

My husband grew up on apple juice.  When we first started living together, he still loved his apple juice.  I was not brought up with juice, and I just couldn’t get my arms around this one.  In fact, when his mother comes to visit – she still drinks her cup of apple juice in the morning.  Slowly he stopped drinking it – and he actually supported me in a pretty much a non-juice household with the kids.  I just feel that if you are going to get your fruit intake, it might as well be from real fruit (this is from the non-fruit eater…so I should really talk…one of the joys of motherhood, making up the rules) and not from juice.

I started giving the kids juice in their lunch, because it takes too much time to stand in line and buy milk – they only have 15-20 minutes to eat their lunch, and semi-cold milk in a lunch box is really not good.  I remember one day the girls came home – both of them, and told me that they hated apple juice.  I was kind of shocked.  Because they didn’t have juice growing up – when they would be at birthday parties – they would drink anything that remotely resembled juice, like it was going out of style.  Needless to say, I stopped putting apple juice in their lunches.  They both take water bottles to school – and sometimes would just rather just have water anyway.

Even though I am not a juice fan, I put cider in a completely different category.  I love a good hot apple cider drink – with all those spices and complex flavors.  It is the true sign of fall.  I saw this recipe in the Food in Jars cookbook – and couldn’t wait for fall to come.  I went to the farmer’s market to buy the apple cider from the best apple stand at the market.  It came in this beautiful glass bottle – and it was amazing.  I knew this was going to make incredible jelly.  I was a little nervous at first, because it was my first attempt by myself to make jelly – and I overcooked my first batch.  It was still edible, but it got a little more firm than it was supposed to.  The next batch though, I watched the thermometer like a hawk, did the plate test – and it came out perfectly.  The girls LOVE this jelly – even with peanut butter.  It is definitely the best jelly I have ever made…oh right, it is the only jelly I have made.  So maybe I didn’t bring my kids up on apple juice, but now they are being brought up with mulled cider jelly – now maybe I can be in the running for the best mom ever, instead of the mom that deprived her kids of juice.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 (1.75 ounce/50 g packet) powdered pectin
  • 4 cups fresh pressed apple cider
  • zest of 1 orange
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Preparation

Fill your canning pot with water and begin to bring it to temperature. Wash your jars and rings in warm soapy water and set aside. Put your lids in a small pot of water and heat (but do not boil) in order to soften the sealing compound.

Measure the sugar into a blow. Whisk the powdered pectin into the sugar to blend.  In a large, nonreactive pot, combine the apple cider and the pectin-spiked sugar.  Add the orange zest and spices.  Bring to a boil and cook over high heat for 15-25 minutes, stirring frequently, until the volume in the pot is greatly reduced.  While you continue to stir, clip a candy thermometer to the pot and watch until the pot reaches 220 degrees F.  There will be a great deal of foaming and bubbling before it reaches this point.  It should look thick and syrupy and the bubbles should look glossy.

Test the set of the jelly using the saucer test (place a saucer in the freezer when you start – when you think the jam is done, place a drop on the plate and return to the freezer for 1-2 minutes, it should wrinkle when you push on it).  If it doesn’t pass, return the pot to the heat and cook for an additional 5 minutes before repeating the test.  When the jelly has reached the desired consistency, turn off the heat and fill the jars. Wipe rims and apply lids. Screw on the bands and lower into the water. Process in the hot water bath 10 minutes. When time is up, remove from water and cool on the counter. When the jars are cooled, check the seal by pressing on the top of the jar. If there’s no movement, the jar has sealed. Store up to one year in a cool, dark place.

Makes 4 pints (yield varies depending on width of pot, cooking length and juiciness of fruit).

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Mulled Cider Jelly

Pear Butter

Fall fruit is here, and I am just LOVING it!!  But, there is actually something else that I am loving right now…and it doesn’t have anything to do with food – although I am using it to post this entry right now.  It is my new Surface.  As you know, I try to keep my blogging life separate from my work life, but occasionally the paths do cross.  Aside from my family and food – I have another passion – it is my work.

When I graduated from High School, my father told me he would buy me a computer for my graduation gift.  This was 1987.  This was long before the internet, and before there was a computer in every home and on every desk.  This was quite a gift.  At this time, most people my age were going for the Macs – they were cute, a nice rectangular shape – and they were starting to pop up everywhere.  I didn’t want a Mac though – I wanted a PC.  I read about Windows, and Microsoft’s vision for computing – and I was sold.  I loved my computer – and if I wasn’t so focused on majoring in mathematics, I probably would have switched to computer science – instead I took a few classes as electives.  When it was time for me to start thinking about what I was going to be when I grew up – I decided I wanted to work for Microsoft.  I went to the library to look up where Microsoft was located, and it was in Redmond, Washington.  Well – at that point – living my entire life on the east coast, I didn’t think I would ever visit Washington, let alone live there.  So I decided that becoming an Actuary would be more realistic.

At first I liked my job – but it soon became boring.  I couldn’t imagine spending my life calculating the ROI on insurance products.  The only thing that got me excited was being able to get into the actuarial software and program my own solutions.  I loved Microsoft Excel – when I wasn’t programming, I would create elaborate spreadsheets to calculate premiums using formulas in Excel.  I remember staring at my computer one day wishing I worked somewhere that produced a tangible product – like Microsoft.  Everyone used it – Windows was popping up everywhere as PCs became more and more mainstream.  I knew what I had to do – I just had to figure out how I was going to do it.

In 1996 my husband and I were deciding where to move next – he had to do his post-doctoral work, and we had narrowed it down to two cities – Seattle and Boston.  Secretly I wanted to move to Seattle so I could work for Microsoft – but I sent them my resume, and didn’t hear back.  I had a job offer with an insurance company, so I resigned to continuing my actuarial work.  That only lasted 18 more months, before the opportunity fell into my lap to go work for Microsoft.  They were looking for accountants, and I convinced them that I was good enough with numbers that I could figure it out.  Ok, so I had never taken an accounting class, but I could learn quickly – and I did.  It was amazing – my job was exciting, and the career opportunities were endless.  I switched jobs every year and a half for the first 5 years, and loved every minute of each of them.  15 years later, I am still at Microsoft, and as passionate as ever about our products.  I know we are the underdog now.  I know we are considered old and stodgy – but I believe in what we can do – and that things will turn around.  The last few years have been tough – it has been hard to watch (some of) my family turn and support our competitors.  I take it personally.  I have put my heart and soul into this company.  Well – with Windows 8 and Surface, I believe we have a new opportunity.  I am extremely proud of what we have been able to accomplish, and I hope the world will give us another chance.

I had to find something really special to post using my new Surface, and this is just about as good as it gets.  The bonus is it makes your entire house smell like fall.  I think I am going to be making this Pear Butter every weekend until the Pears are gone, yes, it is that good.  My husband is completely addicted, and the girls eat this with a spoon.  It is like a very thick applesauce, but so much better.  It spreads so nicely and is perfect on an English muffin – or just spread on more fruit.  Thanks Food in Jars for yet another amazing recipe!  Now I have to go get myself another spoon of this stuff, while I play with my Surface some more…oh, and did I tell you about the touch keyboard??  Magical…

Ingredients

  • 10 cups cored and chopped pears (about 5 pounds)
  • 2 to 3 cups of sugar, or as needed
  • 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  • 3 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Preparation

Place the pears in a 4-quart slow cooker.  Cover and cook on low for 1 hour.  If you have an older slow cooker, they cook cooler, so you may need to cook on high.

Remove the lid and give the pears a stir.  From this point forward, you will want to keep the lid slightly cracked.  I have found that propping it open with a wooden spoon or chopstick gives just enough room for the evaporating steam to escape.

Continue to cook the pears down for an additional 5 to 7 hours, checking every hour and stirring.  After it has cooked for 4 hours, blend the butter for a smoother texture.  For a chunkier consistency, use a potato masher to help break down the pears.

In the final hour of cooking, taste the pears and add 2 to 3 cups of sugar.  Use your judgment and taste buds to determine the correct sugar level.  Add the lemon zest and juice and the spices and stir to combine.

If you need to speed up the process of cooking the pears down, remove the lid and turn the slow cooker to high.  Stay close when it’s on high and stir often.

When the butter is nearing completion, fill your canning pot with water and begin to bring it to temperature. Wash your jars and rings in warm soapy water and set aside. Put your lids in a small pot of water and heat (but do not boil) in order to soften the sealing compound.

When it has reached a consistency that is thick and spreadable, ladle the butter into the prepared jars. Wipe rims and apply lids. Screw on the bands and lower into the water. Process in the hot water bath 15 minutes. When time is up, remove from water and cool on the counter. When the jars are cooled, check the seal by pressing on the top of the jar. If there’s no movement, the jar has sealed. Store up to one year in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months

Makes 3 pints (yield varies depending on width of pot, cooking length and juiciness of fruit).

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Pear Butter

Damson Plum Jam

There is something to be said about making something out of nothing.  I know what it is like to be completely bombarded with fruit from your trees.  It stresses me out.  I find my self force feeding it to the family, and then no one is really enjoying it.  I don’t want to waste a single bit – and that’s why canning is just such a gift.  I have found my calling.

The other week I happened to see my neighbor outside.  It was just after I finished making the fig jam from my other neighbor’s bounty.  He mentioned that his plum-tree was exploding with fruit this year.  Little did he know who he was really talking to…not all of my neighbors know about my little hobbies.  I am not a big fan of plums, but that was before I started jamming.  My eyes got bigger, as I almost burst with excitement.  He asked if I wanted some – and boy did I ever.  I asked if he could spare about 5 pounds, and he looked at me like I was crazy.  I told him that I recently became obsessed with making jam, and I was dying to try this Damson Plum Jam (slightly adapted below) that I found in the Food in Jars book.  I promised I would bring some over for them afterwards.

I had no idea that plum jam could taste so good.  I was also shocked that it came out such a beautiful purple color – especially when the flesh is basically a golden-yellow.  I guess just a little of the purple skin goes a long way, even though all the fruit was peeled.  I decided to add a little cinnamon because my family loves that spice – and it was amazing.  It was so good that I actually called up my neighbors and asked if they had another 5 pounds to spare.  It was like a win-win for both of us – they gave the plums to someone who was going to put them to good use, I got to make jars and jars of delicious plum jam, and they got some as well.  My husband was so proud – who would have thought that plums would give us all so much joy!

Ingredients

  • 8 cups of damson plum pulp, from about 4 1/2 pounds
  • 4 cups of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  • 2 packets (1 box) liquid pectin

Preparation

Fill your canning pot with water and begin to bring it to temperature. Wash your jars and rings in warm soapy water and set aside. Put your lids in a small pot of water and heat (but do not boil) in order to soften the sealing compound.

Put plums in 1 cup of water, and simmer until the skins pop.  Then peel and pit the plums – and squish in your hands until you make pulp.  Add plums and sugar to a large, non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil and cook for about 10-15 minutes, until the jam begins to look molten and syrupy. Add the pectin, cinnamon and lemon juice/zest and bring to a rolling boil for a full five minutes.

Turn off the heat under the jam and fill jars. Wipe rims and apply lids. Screw on the bands and lower into the water. Process in the hot water bath 10 minutes. When time is up, remove from water and cool on the counter. When the jars are cooled, check the seal by pressing on the top of the jar. If there’s no movement, the jar has sealed. Store up to one year in a cool, dark place.

Makes 4 pints (yield varies depending on width of pot, cooking length and juiciness of fruit).

For a printer-friendly version of this recipe, please click here:  Damson Plum Jam