Beef and Guinness Stew

 

Stew time is almost over, so I figured I had to get one last one in before spring hit.  This stew seemed to be calling me – I had all the ingredients already in the house, so I really had no excuse – and what a better way to use up some parsnips and turnips.  Guinness has such a distinct flavor – it is the only beer that I would describe as creamy – yet at the same time that deep nutty flavor takes over in your mouth.  I was always told that Guinness tastes different if you have it in Ireland  – and that is so true.  I am not a beer drinker – but get me in a pub in Ireland, and I will drink a few of these.  The first time I had a Guinness I was in high school (yes, I know…) travelling in Ireland with a string group I played with.  One night after a concert we all went to a pub – and almost everyone ordered a Guinness – I couldn’t believe how delicious it was – it went down so easily, and the rich foam reminded me of drinking a milkshake.  I remember my first Guinness back in the states after having one in Ireland – and it was horrible in comparison.  Nothing beats a freshly poured Guinness right from the tap in Ireland.  That is for sure.

I saw this recipe in Cooking Light, and I knew it would be good.  Even after it had been cooking for hours, you could still taste that nutty, dark flavor coming through.  The combination with the sweet parsnips was warm and comforting. 

It is only fitting that my last stew of the season used a Guinness beer – it is hard to believe it was 23 years ago (almost exactly) that I tasted my first Guinness in Ireland.  What a nice way to celebrate a wonderful memory.

Ingredients

  • 2  tablespoons  canola oil, divided
  • 1  tablespoon  butter, divided
  • 1/4  cup  all-purpose flour
  • 2  pounds  boneless chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1  teaspoon  salt, divided
  • 5  cups  chopped onion (about 3 onions)
  • 1  tablespoon  tomato paste
  • 4  cups  fat-free, less-sodium beef broth
  • 1  (11.2-ounce) bottle Guinness Draught
  • 1  tablespoon  raisins
  • 1  teaspoon  caraway seeds
  • 1/2  teaspoon  black pepper
  • 1 1/2  cups  (1/2-inch-thick) diagonal slices carrot (about 8 ounces)
  • 1 1/2  cups  (1/2-inch-thick) diagonal slices parsnip (about 8 ounces)
  • 1  cup  (1/2-inch) cubed peeled turnip (about 8 ounces)
  • 2  tablespoons  finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preparation

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 1 1/2 teaspoons butter to pan. Place flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle beef with 1/2 teaspoon salt; dredge beef in flour. Add half of beef to pan; cook 5 minutes, turning to brown on all sides. Remove beef from pan with a slotted spoon. Repeat procedure with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons butter, and beef.

Add onion to pan; cook 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomato paste; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Stir in broth and beer, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Return meat to pan. Stir in remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, raisins, caraway seeds, and pepper; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Uncover and bring to a boil. Cook 50 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add carrot, parsnip, and turnip. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and bring to a boil; cook 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Sprinkle with parsley.

For a printer friendly version of this recipe, please click here: Beef and Guinness Stew

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